Sunday, October 10, 2021

LONE WOLF HEROE OF THE MONTH!!

 LONE WOLF HEROE OF THE MONTH!!

This chick targetted JOGITES only. Awesome!! Hope more like her pop up.


PITTSBURGH -

The call for help came from the Veterans Affairs hospital in Clarksburg, West Virginia in June 2018


“Our 24/7 duty line received a call from the director of the VA Medical Center there in Clarksburg, that basically indicated that there were several suspicious deaths that had occurred all surrounding severe hypoglycemic events,” said Keith Vereb, an investigator with the VA Office of Inspector General.


That was when a team of federal agents descended on the facility to find out who was behind the murders of seven elderly patients, among them a man from Westmoreland County.


So who was this person, and why were they walking into patient’s rooms and killing them with lethal doses of insulin?


“It came pretty clear to us early on that there didn’t appear to be a logical medical explanation for the events. And it came clear to us that this appeared to be most likely a malicious act,” said VA OIG agent Colin Davis.


Between 2017 and 2018, at least seven patients, all elderly men who served this country, including retired Sgt. Felix McDermott of Ruffsdale, Westmoreland County died under suspicious circumstances. An eighth patient was in critical condition. They were all in the medical center’s surgical ward, known as 3A.


Investigators suspected the patients had been injected with insulin that caused blood sugar levels to drop, ultimately leading to their deaths.


“You have no witnesses. You have no surveillance video. You have nobody confessing. Where do you go from here?” asked Target 11 Investigator Rick Earle.


“Exactly, basically compiling as much as we can, more or less the totality of the circumstances,” Vereb responded.


Investigators began interviewing nurses, doctor and staff and pulling timecards to see who had access to the patients. They also searched rooms for any potential evidence.


The evidence they gathered early on quickly pointed to a potential suspect, a nurse’s aide who started at the hospital in 2015 and worked the overnight shift.


Proving who did it and how would take more than two years. Investigators built a largely circumstantial case relying on very complex and detailed medical evidence. They started by getting consent forms from the victims’ families to exhume and examine the bodies.


“The forensic pathologist identified initially during one of the first autopsies that was done, some significant bruising in the abdomen and so subsequent testing of that tissues sample showed traces of insulin, " said Vereb

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