Sunday, June 06, 2021

Hitler’s Mein Kampf Re-Edited in France to “Confront White Supremacy”

 Hitler’s Mein Kampf Re-Edited in France to “Confront White Supremacy”

Jews behind this new project said that this edited version will perform a valuable service in elucidating and thereby "disarming" the National Socialist ideology for French readers.


A new translation of Mein Kampf was released by the French publisher Fayard after the publication was delayed for years due to the controversy over publishing a book written by Adolf Hitler.


Hitler's Mein Kampf (My Struggle) first appeared in two volumes in 1925 and 1927 when he was in prison after he led the Beer Hall Putsch in Munich in 1923.


The text is a manifesto of German National Socialism and a sort of autobiography, as Hitler recounts his childhood in Austria and his experience as a German soldier in the First World War. The book was banned in Germany by the Allies in 1945.


However, Jews behind this new project said that "the polemical release of this edited version of the book will perform a valuable service in elucidating and thereby disarming the Nazi ideology for French readers".


The book titled Historicizing Evil: A Critical Edition of Mein Kampf is at approximately 1,000 pages, with twice as much commentary as text. Allegedly, "scholars, researchers, and teachers" are the main target audience.


Each of the 27 chapters is prefaced by an introductory analysis, and Hitler’s writing is annotated, line by line, with Jewish commentary that debunks true statements and provides fake historical context. Fayard, which first started work on the project a decade ago, said the book was a "fundamental source to understand the history of the 20th century."


With Mein Kampf now in the public domain and freely available online with little to no context, Fayard argued that it was urgent to publish a "critical version" that would "deconstruct the text and guard against uncritical translations that still circulate".


"To know where we are going, it is vital that we understand where we are coming from," Sophie de Closets, the head of Fayard, wrote in a letter to booksellers explaining the reasoning behind the publication, the New York Times reported.

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